Centro de Documentación Mapuche Documentation Center
  Portada | Nosotros | Enlaces | Buscar Visita nuestro canal youtube   translate
 

Secciones

Noticias
Antecedentes
Comunidades
Campañas
Indoamérica
Cultura
Libros Ñuke Mapu
Documentos de Trabajo
Sobre Ñuke Mapu
Opinión
Biblioteca


Archivos

Archivo 1997-2009

2016-09-16 | Cultura | Indoamericano

Teaching a new story of Indigenous experience

Evelyn Steinhauer says her dissertation for completing her PhD in the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Education begins with a story about a young Indigenous girl starting her first day of school—a story drawn from her own childhood. “She’s all excited, she can’t wait for the big yellow bus to drive up, she can’t sleep the night before. But when she walks through the school with a busload of kids from the reserve, every child that’s been playing stops and they begin laughing at her. She can’t understand why people are laughing, why people hate her,” Steinhauer says. “That story should have changed by now. But my grandkids are telling the same story when they get home from school that I told 50 years ago. I want them to tell a different story.”


Evelyn Steinhauer with interim dean of education Randy Wimmer (Photo: Faculty of Education)
Mandatory course challenges future teachers to gain the knowledge they need to engage all students.

Since well before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action and the Alberta government’s recent commitment to train K-12 teachers in delivering Indigenous content, changing the story for Indigenous students by making schools more welcoming, inclusive and respectful of Indigenous ways of knowing has been a big part of Steinhauer’s professional focus. It’s a cause she’s advanced as the director of the U of A’s Aboriginal Teacher Education Program, as a professor in the Department of Educational Policy Studies and as a member of the Faculty of Education’s Indigenous Education Council (IEC), the group of Aboriginal scholars that advises the dean on matters pertaining to First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) education.
She’s not alone in her wish to change the story. The federal and provincial governments have pledged to improve educational outcomes for Indigenous youth, whose high-school graduation rates and participation in post-secondary education are lower than the general Canadian population. Initiatives like the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and Alberta’s recent commitment of $5 million over the next three years to help train K-12 teachers in fundamental Indigenous knowledge “for the betterment of all students” seem to echo the sentiment expressed by some Indigenous educators: it’s not a segment of the population that’s failing school, but school that is failing a segment of the population.

________________________________________
“I want our children to graduate from high school, to build careers for themselves. I want our children to be confident and feel that they belong in the school system. The only way that’s going to happen is if we start training teachers to think differently.” —Evelyn Steinhauer
________________________________________

Steinhauer, who comes from the Saddle Lake Cree Nation, was a graduate student at the U of A when she first took part in discussions around incorporating more FNMI content in education courses in the early 2000s. Later, when she joined the Faculty of Education, she and the IEC pressed for a mandatory course that would introduce all bachelor of education students to Indigenous history, culture and knowledge, but also to the devastating impact of colonization and the intergenerational trauma that is the legacy of residential schools.
Their efforts yielded the introduction of EDU 211: Aboriginal Education and Contexts for Professional and Personal Engagement as a mandatory course in 2013. Steinhauer and colleagues Cora Weber-Pillwax, Dwayne Donald and Rebecca Sockbeson were awarded the University of Alberta Human Rights Education Recognition Teaching Award that year for creating the course.
Sockbeson, a professor of educational policy studies, says the award was a reflection of the unprecedented consultation within the faculty that helped with getting EDU 211 as a mandatory course.
“This is a large faculty, so to bring together varying ideologies and expertise within the same discipline was a first for this faculty,” she says. “We received real positive feedback from our faculty colleagues to such a degree that it was recognized this was unlike anything they’d seen.”
Another distinctive aspect of EDU 211 is that the course is designed and team-taught by five Indigenous scholars with the assistance of predominantly Aboriginal graduate students, PhDs and other instructors working both in the lecture hall and in seminars. The sheer volume of BEd students necessitates the approach, but Sockbeson says team teaching is intrinsic to making the course work.
“What distinguishes EDU 211 is that we have these five scholars and we each contribute within our own areas of expertise,” she says. “We knew as we were coming together who would be taking on what, but as we developed the course outline, we had to figure out how we were going to reach 1,000 students a year so that they can have exposure to our scholarship and expertise. It was actually very arduous, a rigorous process to figure out how we were going to do that.”
The course also provides two experiential components for every student, whether that’s meeting with an elder, participating in a smudge ceremony, taking a guided walk in the area around the campus or watching and discussing a documentary about Indigenous experiences in Canada’s education system.
“That’s what the students claim is the area of transformation for them because it’s hands-on,” Sockbeson says. “Although we give them lots of information before they engage with the experiential, we were committed as scholars of the course that they would be experiencing the theories. And that underpins for many of us the significance of an Indigenous pedagogy, too.”
Sockbeson adds that it’s not strictly a course about “studying the other.”

________________________________________
“If there’s an expectation you’re just coming to study Native people, that’s not what underpins this course. Much of it has to do with putting a mirror up and looking at themselves and their own teacher identity. Who we are impacts who we are working with, particularly children.” —Rebecca Sockbeson
________________________________________

“We give lots of information—history, policies, legislation—but we also expect students to engage with their own ethnicity, their own race, how they come to be here and what is their lineage, what does that mean to them. For many of them, they’ve never stopped to think about it, and that’s a very central part of the course.”
Donald, a professor of secondary education, says he sees many students struggle with questions of their identity and their relationship to systemic racism, cultural displacement and colonization. Many become “stuck” in self-defensiveness or guilt, he says, and helping them work through those feelings has become a significant part of the job in teaching EDU 211.
“That’s why in this course a central part of it is asking them to try to study themselves—who are you, what’s the story you’re living by—and there’s a lot of pushback that comes with that.”
The refusal by some students to engage with course material can be difficult for EDU 211’s instructors as well, especially when the knowledge of systemic racism and marginalization they share comes from a personal place.

________________________________________
“I don’t expect every student to agree with what I say, but this is a professional responsibility to engage with these issues. Our job isn’t to convince them of anything, but to continue to support them in the messiness of trying to work stuff out.” —Dwayne Donald
________________________________________

“The one thing people don’t recognize is that those of us who lecture on these topics have experienced every one of those things,” Steinhauer says. “When I tell a story of kids in a playground playing a game called Indian germs, that’s my story. When I talk about a kid not getting picked for sports teams because she’s Native, I’m that little girl. When children are being apprehended from their homes and placed in non-Native homes, those are our experiences. It takes an emotional toll on you because you can’t step away from something that’s been your whole experience.”
Malinda Smith, a professor in the U of A’s Department of Political Science whose scholarship focuses on decolonization, says the destabilizing nature of a course like EDU 211 puts its professors in a tough position.
“When students come into our classrooms, they come with this baggage and it’s a challenge then to unsettle that. The problem is that professors who are tasked with teaching these so-called difficult knowledges carry the weight of this knowledge for the university and are disproportionately impacted,” Smith says. “So, paradoxically, we want to recruit and retain more Indigenous faculty but at the same time we’re putting them in conditions that make their teaching experiences more difficult than for other professors who don’t have to teach this kind of content.
“These are real professors. This is their career, this is something they love, and they are doing it as part of their professional obligation, but they also think it’s the right thing to do. I think students have some obligations to be open, but where do they learn that? That’s also in the classroom.”
Smith says the real test of Canadian universities’ commitment to truth and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples is how widely the professoriate will support the process of incorporating Indigenous knowledges into curricula, so that challenging topics raised in one course can be addressed in other courses.
“This is the challenge we’re facing in the 21st century, and this is our opportunity as non-Indigenous peoples and as a university committed to the public good to think about how to do the right thing, and how to do it well for the students, the faculty teaching it and the broader community. I don’t see how you can do that without widespread conversation throughout the university, across disciplines. We can’t have a handful of professors feeling isolated or alone, or that they alone are tasked with doing this for the rest of us, so that we can say we are doing our bit. We are all obligated to do this work.”
Smith adds that it may be the human tendency to focus on problems elsewhere in the world and overlook similar problems at home that present a barrier to change. It goes back to the fundamental question of what kind of graduates universities want to produce.

________________________________________
“If we are encouraging students to be global citizens, how can we be inattentive to the questions about Indigenous people here in Canada?” —Malinda Smith
________________________________________

“Education faculties have led conversations about global citizenship. So if we are encouraging students to be global citizens, how can we be inattentive to the questions about Indigenous people here in Canada?” Smith says. “We are able to see these questions more clearly from a distance, in other countries, rather than what’s visible in plain sight around Indigenous conditions. I think curriculum content is key around such issues.”
This notion rings true to Salman Ahmed, a third-year education student who took EDU 211 in the winter of 2015. Ahmed says he had planned to finish his degree and pursue his interest in social justice outside Canada. But after learning about the difficulties faced by northern communities in staffing their schools, he’s considering a different career trajectory.
“Before the course, I was extremely naive in thinking I like volunteering and I’m into human rights, I’ll just get a teaching degree and go halfway across the world to help some disenfranchised person. But after that course, I learned how high the turnover rate is among teachers up north. Our education system doesn’t have a great history with Aboriginal people, so families that are just starting to entrust school systems with their children and then have them treated this way—I mean, if the teachers aren’t able to stay and show their willingness to help, what motivates the kids to go to school?”
Ahmed says he wants to get involved in helping marginalized youth in the Edmonton region and may start his teaching career at a northern school.
Joanna Gill, who completed a bachelor’s degree in anthropology before pursuing an master’s in educational policy studies, says EDU 211 helped her think more deeply about being the kind of teacher that all of her students need.
“The instructors did point out that, no matter where you are, you will have Indigenous students in your class. Even having that level of awareness and the background of what they might be facing is good,” she says. “As a social studies teacher, I think that being able to provide accurate or a greater breadth of information in terms of Aboriginal history is going to be very helpful as well.”
The problem with a semester-long course like EDU 211 is that it may not be long enough to resolve some of the issues the coursework brings to the surface, Gill adds.
“Experiencing the knowledge of racism in Canada, that’s where a lot of the discomfort lies. A lot of students wished they could have had an opportunity to get more information about where we go from here, what we do with the discomfort we have from learning these things.”
And though he acknowledges there’s nothing easy about questioning the social underpinnings of inequality and one’s own privilege, Donald says learning about Indigenous knowledges and perspectives could take students past defensiveness to a more constructive way of thinking.
“I think if we critique the systems that govern us now, a lot of times it’s a bit of a trap because there’s no escape from those philosophies; people don’t have anything else to hang onto. Indigenous wisdom provides that possibility for a different way to proceed,” he says.
“I think that was the vision of the treaties, that there would be this learning from each other, there would be a balanced way of looking at the world. This wisdom I’m talking about has been here a long time, so it’s connected to this place. So if you’re going to live here and rely on the resources here, you should know that as well. It shouldn’t be an imposition, but an opportunity.”

By Scott Lingley on September 14, 2016
Source: https://www.ualberta.ca/news-and-events/newsarticles/2016/september/teaching-a-new-story-of-indigenous-experience?utm_source=Daily%20News%20Email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily%20News:%20September%2015,%202016&utm_content=1799822

Fuente: Centro de Documentación Mapuche, Ñuke Mapu

 Campañas

2017-05-01

No Mineria en Ruta 40 - Greenpeace

NO a la mina a cielo abierto en Cueva de las Manos

Estimada Ministra: creemos que el sitio Cueva de las Manos y su entorno, con más de 70 yacimientos arqueológicos de similar valor, deben ser un bien público administrado por un equipo independiente del poder minero, con autoridad para proteger no sólo las pinturas, sino también la riqueza de la naturaleza y el paisaje cultural enmarcado en 10.000 años de historia de presencia humana.
QUEREMOS UN PARQUE NACIONAL Y NO LA MINA DE ORO A CIELO ABIERTO de PATAGONIA GOLD (CARLOS MIGUENS).
¿Por qué es esto importante?
Firma la petición
Lea más...

2017-05-12

Formalizados por difundir información:

La situación que enfrentan los comunicadores independientes

Se trata de profesionales que desarrollan sus actividades en La Araucanía y han denunciado sistemáticos abusos a las comunidades mapuche. Es claro el rol de los comunicadores sociales bajo un sistema de información basado en el sensacionalismo, las influencias políticas y los intereses económicos. Ver video: Operación Tauro - Allanamiento en Comunidad Rodrigo Melinao. 24 de Enero de 2017 “Ojo, este video no saldrá en los grandes medios de comunicación masiva. Ponga compartir”, es el mensaje que se lee en las redes de difusión independientes que buscan romper con el cerco informativo que caracteriza a la prensa tradicional respecto de la violencia y el abuso a los derechos humanos.
Lea más...

2017-05-20

En el contexto urbano de Santiago

Organización de un ideario político de base mapuche

En reunión convocada a Mapuche de la ciudad de Santiago, se juntarán a construir el ideario político que se transforme en la base de la participación política como actor activo, critico y propositivo, ante las políticas que emanen desde el Estado hacia la población Mapuche, en el contexto urbano de la ciudad de Santiago, y deliberar en torno al tema central: Dialogo político, ante un año electoral y la participación mapuche en el contexto urbano de Santiago. El buen éxito de lo que se planteará dependerá en alto grado de la actitud de las diversas agrupaciones, tendencias políticas, en el plano de culturización que se ha tenido, y la participación activa y directa en los diversos planteamientos y programas económicos y sociales que aquí emanen.
Lea más...

2017-05-31

Confederación de Nacionalidades Indígenas del Ecuador-CONAIE

Tambores Suenan/ Radio revista

Programa institucional “Tambores Suenan”, la voz de los pueblos y nacionalidades, para informar, profundizar y difundir sobre las realidades que atraviesa los pueblos y nacionalidades en Ecuador cada segundo (2) y cuarto (4) jueves de cada mes. El estreno se dio este jueves 30 de marzo a las 16h00 (Ecuador) a través de Radio Conaie (www.conaie.org) y Wambra Radio (www.wambraradio.com). Puedes sintonizar de nuevo en: https://mx.ivoox.com/es/estreno-tambores-suenan-segunda-temporada-marzo-2-audios-mp3_rf_17870955_1.html
Lea más...

2017-07-22

37 encarcelados entre imputados y condenados; Abril 2017

Listado Actualizado de Presos Políticos Mapuche en cárcel de Lebu, Angol, Temuco y Concepción

La prisión política mapuche es hoy una realidad en Chile. Por más que el estado la niegue, siguen existiendo casos de mapuche encarcelados producto de la persecución política que se ha desencadenado con fuerza en las comunidades mapuche. La respuesta política del estado -mediante la represión policial-, a una cuestión nacional de ribetes tanto históricos como políticos, no ha hecho más que aumentar la fuerza de una llama que nunca se ha apagado, pues el newen mapuche y nuestra dignidad jamás se han visto mermados en la larga historia de nuestro pueblo; menos aún si se trata de recuperar nuestro Wallmapu.
Lea más...

2017-11-16

Se agrava con varios heridos en Argentina

La histórica pugna entre Benetton y los mapuches

La comunidad indígena, que reclama su derecho ancestral sobre las tierras de la Patagonia argentina, fue repelida violentamente por más de 200 oficiales. Amnistía Internacional repudió el hecho.
Lea más...

2017-12-27

Benetton y los mapuches, batalla sin fin en la Patagonia argentina

Un grupo de indígenas se instala en una parte de las 900.000 hectáreas con 100.000 ovejas que tiene el grupo italiano en el país austral. Los intentos por sacarlos han acabado con heridos graves.
Lea más...

2020-01-05

Software desarrollado para apoyar la enseñanza del Mapudungun

Aquí plasmamos voces de niños, de adultos y ancianos, voces de aves, de árboles y de vertientes, para seguir aprendiendo con dignidad y horizontalidad, conscientes de su origen y proyectándose a dialogar con el mundo, pues las lenguas tienen que ocupar los espacios de la comunicación y del aprendizaje.
Descarga Mapudungun Mew
Lea más...

2020-01-06

Progreso occidental

Lea más...

2020-01-14

¿Qué nos legó Occidente en su intento de globalización colonizadora?

La recargada colonialidad permanente en América Latina

La condición de colonialidad no sólo configura en el colonizado la idealización “natural” del color, sentir, hacer y pensar del colonizador, sino que instala dispositivos nefastos en las estructuras psicológicas más profundas del primero que irremediablemente lo convierten en un ser creyente que diviniza al segundo. Por tanto, para él o la colonizada, las condiciones de subordinación/despojo no sólo son vistas como “realidades normales”, sino que son asumidas con gratitud como una “benevolencia” del colonizador. Quizás por ello, no es común preguntarse sobre la benignidad del histórico legado colonial permanente que comenzó hace 524 años, en Abya Yala.
Lea más...

2020-01-30

Historia, colonialismo y resistencia desde el país Mapuche

Ta iñ fijke xipa rakizuameluwün.

Acceso libre al libro Ta iñ fijke xipa rakizuameluwün: Historia, colonialismo y resistencia desde el país Mapuche. Temuco: Ediciones Comunidad de Historia Mapuche, 2012. Descarga
Lea más...

2020-02-01

Centro de Documentación Mapuche Ñuke Mapu

Libros históricos para estudio, consulta sobre el pueblo Mapuche (descarga en formato PDF)

Libros históricos para estudio, consulta sobre el pueblo Mapuche tanto en su estructura síquica y en su idiosincrasia, siendo la característica primaria del pueblo mapuche su fortaleza.

Nota: Estos documentos pertenece al patrimonio cultural comun, por lo que puede ser utilizado y reproducidos libremente.
Libros históricos para estudio, consulta sobre el pueblo Mapuche (descarga en formato PDF)
Lea más...

2020-02-02

Publicación sobre la cultura, sociedad y política de los pueblos originarios.

El periódico Pukara

El Periódico Pukara quiere ser un baluarte en el lucha de ideas, en el combate de principios, en la guerra conceptual, de análisis, de información e investigación que libran los pueblos indígenas contra el ocupante colonialista. El periódico Pukara es una publicación mensual sobre la cultura, sociedad y política de los pueblos originarios. Periodico Pukara
Lea más...

2020-02-02

La convocatoria se encuentra abierta todo el año.

Corpus revista de divulgación, análisis sobre la historia o etnografía de los pueblos originarios

Corpus es una revista de divulgación, análisis y crítica de fuentes inéditas o desconocidas sobre la historia o etnografía de los pueblos originarios y campesinos, y de discusión en torno a raza, etnicidad y otras formas de alteridad social y política en el continente americano.
La convocatoria se encuentra abierta todo el año para publicar, compartir y desclasificar los materiales o fuentes de información.
Lea más...

2020-02-02

Manual completo en formato PDF para consulta o descarga :

Manual para defender los derechos de los pueblos indígenas

El objetivo de este manual es contribuir, con un instrumento práctico, a la labor que realizan personas, pueblos indígenas y organizaciones dedicadas a proteger y gestionar a favor de los derechos de los pueblos indígenas.
Lea más...

2020-02-02

ONU Foro permanente de los pueblos indigenas

Lea más...

2020-02-03

La expansión de la cultura occidental y la subordinación de la mujer

La conmovedora historia de la mujer objeto occidental

El uso del cuerpo de la mujer en publicidad es violencia simbólica, muy evidente y perceptible. La subordinación sexual de la mujer en la promoción de ventas es un elemento clave en las campañas de marketing que la exponen como mercancía, y objeto sexual. A la mujer occidental en los spots comerciales se le presenta sin cualidades y habilidades intelectuales y se le reduce en un objeto de satisfacción de necesidad biológica del hombre occidental. Mire el video:
Lea más...

2020-02-13

Programa Radial Mapuche

Wixage Anai espacio para la expresion Mapuce

Peñi, lamgen es importante que usted pueda sumar su apoyo a esta labor de comunicación que hace 21 años se realiza, asistiendo a los encuentros que convocamos u otras iniciativas. Correo electrónico: wixageanai.radio@gmail.com Telefono: 92246211
escuchar aquí:
Lea más...

2020-03-26

Año 2016: Acuerdo Unión Europea y Turquía

Convierte la isla de Lesbos, Grecia en campo de deportación de refugiados

Médicos sin Fronteras, ACNUR y otras ONG suspenden sus actividades en el campo de Moria en la isla de Lesbos; Grecia para no ser "cómplices de un sistema injusto e inhumano". Tras la entrada en vigor del acuerdo alcanzado entre la Unión Europea y Turquía el campo de acogida de refugiados de Moria se ha convertido en un centro de deportación de refugiados. Los Veintiocho de la Unión Europea acordaron resolver el problema de las migraciones a través de “la reubicación.” El acuerdo Unión Europea y Turquía obliga a solicitantes de asilo a subir esposados a los barcos sin informarles de su destino. Este acuerdo vulnera la Convención de Ginebra sobre el Estatuto de los Refugiados en lo relativo al principio de no devolución y a la prohibición de expulsiones colectivas. Una flagrante violación de los derechos humanos, del Derecho Internacional Humanitario y de las libertades fundamentales. Polonia, Hungría y otros Estados europeos; tradicionalmente países de emigración, anuncian que no recibirán refugiados...
Lea más...

Quieren Destruir los bosques y rios de El Bolson y la Patagonia Andina


La Realidad Mapuche en Youtube


Benetton y los mapuche


¿Qué es la Declaración sobre los Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas?


Aprenda Mapunzugun, el idioma Mapuche, via Internet: comprenda el contexto sociocultural- linguístico e interétnico del Pueblo Mapuche.